Jack Dorsey doesn‘t have a laptop and does everything on his smartphone — one app at a time

Getty ImagesTwitter co-founder Jack Dorsey on his phone.

SYDNEY — The risks of overusing social media and smartphones are more prevalent than ever before.

As devices and applications continue to play more important roles in our lives, many question what effect they are having on our health.

Today, co-founder and CEO of Twitter revealed he doesn’t even use a laptop, and solely works on his smartphone.

It’s this consumer behaviour that is forcing companies to consider how their apps and platforms are impacting the individual.

Speaking at Twitter’s Australian HQ in Sydney on Friday, Dorsey added context around how he uses his devices, when discussing the risks of social media.

“Anything can consume all of your time, but certainly the devices we have have so much on them… and you can certainly go down a hole, so I have developed a lot of personal practices,” he said.

“I don’t check my phone in the morning until I am about to walk into work.

“When I am working on my phone I turn off notifications,” he said, adding that he only ever uses one application at a time.

“[That’s] so I can really focus on what’s in front of me, [rather] than everything that is coming at me as I would a laptop.”

“When we’re having meetings — phones down, laptops closed so we can actually focus.

“And not just spend an hour together but make the time meaningful, so if that time is 15 minutes, it’s 15 minutes and we move on with our lives.

“If we have our phones open, our laptops open and all these things are coming at us, I find that we get distracted and we do other things that take away from the attention from actually why we’re meeting in the first place, and it just becomes a whole lot less effective.

“All of these tools have considerations we need to make to use them in healthy ways.

“Right now we’re looking at the health of public conversation on Twitter, but eventually we will look at individual health and how we’re impacting individuals. And how can we have someone walk away from Twitter feeling more empowered and feeling more happy, and feeling like they got something of value.

“It’s not going to happen all the time but we need to be able to measure that, and that we are respectful of people’s time.

“They come to us for a reason, and that’s to be informed about what’s happening, and are we actually delivering on that job.”

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